20-May-2019
From Futurism
In a new interview, MIT researcher Rizwan Virk told Digital Trends that, in his estimation, we’re probably living in a simulation.
“I would say it’s somewhere between 50 and 100 percent,” he told the site. “I think it’s more likely that we’re in simulation than not.”
20-May-2019
From Medium
An emerging techno-consumerism is taking aim at what makes us human: love, happiness, politics, the search for meaning and more. It amounts to the beginnings of a new kind of modernity.

The founders of a new, AI-fuelled chatbot want it to become your best friend and most perceptive counsellor. An intelligent robot pet promises to assuage chronic loneliness among the elderly. The creators of an immersive virtual world — meant to be populated by thousands or even millions of users — say it will generate new insight into the nature of justice and democracy.
Three seemingly unrelated snapshots of these dizzying, accelerated times. But look closer and they all point towards the beginnings of a profound shift in our relationship to technology. How we use it and relate to it. What we think, ultimately, it is for.
This shift amounts to the emergence of a new kind of modern experience; a new kind of modernity. Let’s assign this emerging moment a name — augmented modernity.
20-May-2019
From Futurism
Ever since Einstein posited that space and time were inextricably linked, scientists have wondered where the cosmic web called spacetime comes from.
Now, ongoing research in quantum physics may finally arrive at an explanation: A bizarre phenomenon called quantum entanglement could be the underlying basis for the four dimensions of space and time in which we all live, according to a deep dive by Knowable Magazine. In fact, in a mind-boggling twist, our reality could be a “hologram” of this quantum state.
20-May-2019
From Engadget
"The future won't be the future without a Princess Leia projector."

SciFi movies like Star Wars and Avatar depict holograms that you can see from any angle, but the reality is a lot less scintillating. So far, the only true color hologram we've seen come from a tiny, complicated display created by a Korean group led by LG, while the rest are just "Pepper's Ghost" style illusions. Now, researchers from Brigham Young University (BYU) have created a true 3D hologram, or "volumetric image," to use the correct term. "We can think about this image like a 3D-printed object," said BYU assistant prof and lead author Daniel Smalley.
20-May-2019
From Engadget
A breakthrough in studying light might just be the ticket to the future of quantum computing. Researchers at EPFL have found a way to determine how light behaves beyond the limitations of wavelengths, opening the door to encoding quantum data in a sci-fi style holographic light pattern. The team took advantage of the quantum nature of the interaction between electrons and light to separate beams in terms energy, not space -- that let them use light pulses to encrypt info on the electron wave and map it with a speedy electron microscope.

Existing techniques for both studying light and extracting 3D info are inherently limited by the size of wavelengths. This allows a considerably higher resolution that can even include holographic movies of fast-moving objects.
20-May-2019
From New York Times
Scientists have created a living organism whose DNA is entirely human-made — perhaps a new form of life, experts said, and a milestone in the field of synthetic biology.

Researchers at the Medical Research Council Laboratory of Molecular Biology in Britain reported on Wednesday that they had rewritten the DNA of the bacteria Escherichia coli, fashioning a synthetic genome four times larger and far more complex than any previously created.
20-May-2019
From Nautilus
Contrary to popular belief, peace and quiet is all about the noise in your head.

One icy night in March 2010, 100 marketing experts piled into the Sea Horse Restaurant in Helsinki, with the modest goal of making a remote and medium-sized country a world-famous tourist destination. The problem was that Finland was known as a rather quiet country, and since 2008, the Country Brand Delegation had been looking for a national brand that would make some noise.

Over drinks at the Sea Horse, the experts puzzled over the various strengths of their nation. Here was a country with exceptional teachers, an abundance of wild berries and mushrooms, and a vibrant cultural capital the size of Nashville, Tennessee. These things fell a bit short of a compelling national identity. Someone jokingly suggested that nudity could be named a national theme—it would emphasize the honesty of Finns. Someone else, less jokingly, proposed that perhaps quiet wasn’t such a bad thing. That got them thinking.
20-May-2019
From Popsci.com
The first U.S. trial of CRISPR in humans has begun, NPR reported Tuesday. Two patients are currently being treated as part of a University of Pennsylvania study. Per NPR, both have difficult-to-treat forms of cancer and both have relapsed after regular treatments. As part of the trial, researchers are taking immune cells from the patients’ own bodies and editing them with CRISPR before putting them back in. The hope is that these edited cells will be better at identifying and attacking the cancer than their unaltered counterparts. According to the U.S. government clinical trial registry, the researchers are hoping to enroll 18 people in their study.
20-May-2019
From Aeon
Is this life real?
Philosophers and physicists say we might be living in a computer simulation, but how can we tell? And does it matter?

Our species is not going to last forever. One way or another, humanity will vanish from the Universe, but before it does, it might summon together sufficient computing power to emulate human experience, in all of its rich detail. Some philosophers and physicists have begun to wonder if we’re already there. Maybe we are in a computer simulation, and the reality we experience is just part of the program.
10-May-2019
From Worldhealth.net
Imagine if you will, the possibility of future technology that can provide instant access to information and artificial intelligence simply by thinking of it; communication, education, work, privacy, security, and the world as we know it would be dramatically transformed.

An article published in Frontiers in Neuroscience predicts that exponential progress in nanotechnology, nanomedicine, artificial intelligence, and computation will lead to development of a Human Brain/Cloud Interface that will connect brain cells to vast cloud computing networks in real time within this century bringing about the internet of thought.

Image credits: https://androidjones.com
03-May-2019
From The Sun
Elon Musk has tweeted that his brain computer chip technology, which he believes will turn humans into a genius super race, is coming soon.

The billionaire has been developing the technology, called Neuralink, because he thinks humans must become one with machines in order to survive being replaced by artificial intelligence.

Musk's plan to "save the human race" involves wiring computer chips into our minds to merge us with artificial intelligence.
26-Apr-2019
From Hackernoon

In Part I of this series, Religion and the Simulation Hypothesis: Is God an AI?, we looked at the implications of the Simulation Hypothesis, the theory that we are all living inside a sophisticated video game, as a model for how many things that are religious in nature might actually be implemented using science and technology. We looked briefly at the groundbreaking film, the Matrix, and how it brought this idea forward into popular consciousness with its release 20 years ago. We also looked at some of the central tenets of the Western (or more accurately, Middle Eastern or Abrahamic) religious traditions to show how they were not only consistent with this new theory, but this theory provided a way to bridge the ever-widening gap between religion and science.
In this second part of the series, we turn to the Eastern religious traditions, Hinduism and Buddhism in particular (and some of their offshoots), and look at some of its central tenants. While we had to search for ways that simulation hypothesis might be implied in some of the core beliefs of the Western religions, the simulation hypothesis (or more specifically, the video game version of the simulation hypothesis) seem almost tailor made to fit into these traditions.

26-Apr-2019
From Phys.org

A localization phenomenon boosts the accuracy of solving quantum many-body problems with quantum computers. These problems are otherwise challenging for conventional computers. This brings such digital quantum simulation within reach using quantum devices available today.

26-Apr-2019
From Science Alert

Humanity could be on the verge of an unprecedented merging of human biology with advanced technology, fusing our thoughts and knowledge directly with the cloud in real-time – and this incredible turning point may be just decades away, scientists say.

In a new research paper exploring what they call the 'human brain/cloud interface', scientists explain the technological underpinnings of what such a future system might be, and also address the barriers we'll need to address before this sci-fi dream becomes reality.

26-Apr-2019
From Mashable India

Researchers have been making massive ‘jaw-dropping’ strides in robotics lately. We’re already aware of Sophia, the ‘almost human’ robot created by former Disney Imagineer David Hanson, that can inspire feelings of love among humans. Now, scientists at Cornell University have come out with a new ‘lifelike’ material that can move and eat on its own. What’s even more mind-boggling is that this material can also die and decay, just like living beings.

26-Apr-2019
From WIRED

A year ago, you couldn’t go anywhere in Silicon Valley without being reminded in some way of Tristan Harris. The former Googler was giving talks, appearing on podcasts, counseling Congress, sitting on panels, posing for photographers. The central argument of his evangelism—that the digital revolution had gone from expanding our minds to hijacking them—had hit the zeitgeist, and maybe even helped create it.

13-Mar-2019
From Wired

Every December, Adam Savage—star of the TV show MythBusters—releases a video reviewing his “favorite things” from the previous year. In 2018, one of his highlights was a set of Magic Leap augmented reality goggles. After duly noting the hype and backlash that have dogged the product, Savage describes an epiphany he had while trying on the headset at home, upstairs in his office. “I turned it on and I could hear a whale,” he says, “but I couldn’t see it. I’m looking around my office for it. And then it swims by my windows—on the outside of my building! So the glasses scanned my room and it knew that my windows were portals and it rendered the whale as if it were swimming down my street. I actually got choked up.” What Savage encountered on the other side of the glasses was a glimpse of the mirrorworld.

13-Mar-2019
From Wired

Facebook is working on a (non-invasive) system that will let you type straight from your brain about 5x faster than you can type on your phone today. The idea is to allow people to use their thoughts to navigate intuitively through augmented reality—the neuro-driven version of the world recently described by Kevin Kelly. No typing—no speaking, even—to distract you or slow you down as you interact with digital additions to the landscape.

02-Mar-2019
From Futurism.com

Augmented reality startup Magic Leap wants to merge the digital and the physical worlds.

In October, CEO Rony Abovitz first shared the idea of the “Magicverse,” a series of digital layers that would exist in AR over the physical world.

On Saturday, the company elaborated on the concept with a blog post and new interview — and its vision of the future is one in which the line between the physical and digital realms blurs until it almost disappears.

27-Feb-2019
From London Business School

What does it mean for humans to thrive in the age of the machine? This is the issue that London Business School professors Andrew Scott and Lynda Gratton are wrestling with in their second major exploration project.

27-Feb-2019
From Fastcompany.com

Google was founded over two decades ago, but they released their first public set of ethical technology principles just last year. Facebook launched out of a Harvard dorm in 2004, but they formally launched an ethics program with a public investment last month. The era of tech companies moving fast and breaking things removed from public accountability is waning, if not entirely over. That’s precisely why it’s important for industry to understand–and admit in some cases–that there’s been a need for accountable, transparent, and companywide ethical practices in technology since the beginning.

09-Feb-2019
From Vulture
When Morpheus told us our reality was fake, it sounded far-fetched. Since then, though, the idea has picked up steam. In 2001, two years after The Matrix hit theaters, Oxford University philosopher Nick Bostrom circulated the first draft of his “simulation argument,” which posits three scenarios: (1) Humanity will go extinct before creating technology powerful enough to run convincing simulations of reality; (2) humanity will live to see such technology but decide, for whatever reason, not to run any simulations; (3) humanity will create that technology and run many different simulations of its evolutionary history — in which case there would be lots of simulated realities and only one non-simulated one, so maybe it’s more likely than not that we’re living in a simulation right now. That third scenario has excited many over the years, including Elon Musk, who in 2016 put our odds of living in a non-simulated reality at “one in billions.” We called Bostrom to discuss his paper’s legacy.
29-Jan-2019
From The Sociable
“The hour hath come to part with this body composed of flesh and blood” – The Tibetan Book of the Dead

Digital immortality through merging the brain with Artificial Intelligence in a brain-computer interface is already well underway with companies like Elon Musk’s Neuralink.
29-Jan-2019
From Herald Scotland
WHISPER it, but many respected scientists and academics are becoming increasingly convinced by left-field provocateur David Icke’s assertion that our reality is an artificial simulation.
29-Jan-2019
From Forbes
I was in line for coffee at the Business Innovation Factory (BIF) Summit this past September and was starting to get jittery. I began making conversation with the guy in front of me to distract myself, and since java was on my mind I figured that was as good a topic as any. So I made a throwaway comment about how useless I was until I got my morning cup.
29-Jan-2019
From We Forum
According to a new study, people who saw what it would be like to lose their jobs and homes using virtual reality developed longer-lasting compassion toward the homeless compared to those who explored other media versions of the VR scenario, like text.

“Experiences are what define us as humans, so it’s not surprising that an intense experience in VR is more impactful than imagining something,” says Jeremy Bailenson, a professor of communication at Stanford University and coauthor of the paper, which appears in PLOS ONE.
29-Jan-2019
From New Scientist
An illusion that mimics near-death experiences seems to reduce people’s fear of dying.

Mel Slater at the University of Barcelona, Spain, and his team have used virtual reality headsets to create the illusion of being separate from your own body. They did this by first making 32 volunteers feel like a virtual body was their own. While wearing a headset, the body would match any real movements the volunteers made. When a virtual ball was dropped onto the foot of the virtual body, a vibration was triggered on the person’s real foot.
29-Jan-2019
From Big Think
For six minutes, 150 miles above Kiruna, Sweden on January 23, 2017 floated the coldest known spot in the universe. As far as we know, the coldest anything in nature can be is absolute zero on the Kelvin scale, which is –459.67°F and –273.15°C. This postage-stamp-sized atom chip packed tight with thousands of rubidium-87 atoms was just a few billionths of a degree warmer than that. The atom chip was up there in low orbit to help a team of scientist study up-close some of the oddest, least-understood stuff there is: Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC). The team of German scientists was led by Dennis Becker of QUEST-Leibniz Research School, Leibniz University Hannover, Hanover, Germany.
29-Jan-2019
From University of Manchester

The world’s largest neuromorphic supercomputer designed and built to work in the same way a human brain does has been fitted with its landmark one-millionth processor core and is being switched on for the first time.

27-Jan-2019
From RT News

The human brain may become the next frontier in hacking, cybersecurity researchers have warned in a paper outlining the vulnerabilities of neural implant technologies that can potentially expose and compromise our consciousness.

27-Jan-2019
From Quanta Magazine

Computer scientists are looking to evolutionary biology for inspiration in the search for optimal solutions among astronomically huge sets of possibilities.

10-May-2019
From Worldhealth.net
Imagine if you will, the possibility of future technology that can provide instant access to information and artificial intelligence simply by thinking of it; communication, education, work, privacy, security, and the world as we know it would be dramatically transformed.

An article published in Frontiers in Neuroscience predicts that exponential progress in nanotechnology, nanomedicine, artificial intelligence, and computation will lead to development of a Human Brain/Cloud Interface that will connect brain cells to vast cloud computing networks in real time within this century bringing about the internet of thought.

Image credits: https://androidjones.com
03-May-2019
From The Sun
Elon Musk has tweeted that his brain computer chip technology, which he believes will turn humans into a genius super race, is coming soon.

The billionaire has been developing the technology, called Neuralink, because he thinks humans must become one with machines in order to survive being replaced by artificial intelligence.

Musk's plan to "save the human race" involves wiring computer chips into our minds to merge us with artificial intelligence.
26-Apr-2019
From Mashable India

Researchers have been making massive ‘jaw-dropping’ strides in robotics lately. We’re already aware of Sophia, the ‘almost human’ robot created by former Disney Imagineer David Hanson, that can inspire feelings of love among humans. Now, scientists at Cornell University have come out with a new ‘lifelike’ material that can move and eat on its own. What’s even more mind-boggling is that this material can also die and decay, just like living beings.

29-Jan-2019
From The Sociable
“The hour hath come to part with this body composed of flesh and blood” – The Tibetan Book of the Dead

Digital immortality through merging the brain with Artificial Intelligence in a brain-computer interface is already well underway with companies like Elon Musk’s Neuralink.
27-Jan-2019
From RT News

The human brain may become the next frontier in hacking, cybersecurity researchers have warned in a paper outlining the vulnerabilities of neural implant technologies that can potentially expose and compromise our consciousness.

27-Jan-2019
From Quanta Magazine

Computer scientists are looking to evolutionary biology for inspiration in the search for optimal solutions among astronomically huge sets of possibilities.

20-May-2019
From Popsci.com
The first U.S. trial of CRISPR in humans has begun, NPR reported Tuesday. Two patients are currently being treated as part of a University of Pennsylvania study. Per NPR, both have difficult-to-treat forms of cancer and both have relapsed after regular treatments. As part of the trial, researchers are taking immune cells from the patients’ own bodies and editing them with CRISPR before putting them back in. The hope is that these edited cells will be better at identifying and attacking the cancer than their unaltered counterparts. According to the U.S. government clinical trial registry, the researchers are hoping to enroll 18 people in their study.
26-Apr-2019
From Mashable India

Researchers have been making massive ‘jaw-dropping’ strides in robotics lately. We’re already aware of Sophia, the ‘almost human’ robot created by former Disney Imagineer David Hanson, that can inspire feelings of love among humans. Now, scientists at Cornell University have come out with a new ‘lifelike’ material that can move and eat on its own. What’s even more mind-boggling is that this material can also die and decay, just like living beings.

27-Jan-2019
From Quanta Magazine

Computer scientists are looking to evolutionary biology for inspiration in the search for optimal solutions among astronomically huge sets of possibilities.

20-May-2019
From New York Times
Scientists have created a living organism whose DNA is entirely human-made — perhaps a new form of life, experts said, and a milestone in the field of synthetic biology.

Researchers at the Medical Research Council Laboratory of Molecular Biology in Britain reported on Wednesday that they had rewritten the DNA of the bacteria Escherichia coli, fashioning a synthetic genome four times larger and far more complex than any previously created.
10-May-2019
From Worldhealth.net
Imagine if you will, the possibility of future technology that can provide instant access to information and artificial intelligence simply by thinking of it; communication, education, work, privacy, security, and the world as we know it would be dramatically transformed.

An article published in Frontiers in Neuroscience predicts that exponential progress in nanotechnology, nanomedicine, artificial intelligence, and computation will lead to development of a Human Brain/Cloud Interface that will connect brain cells to vast cloud computing networks in real time within this century bringing about the internet of thought.

Image credits: https://androidjones.com
03-May-2019
From The Sun
Elon Musk has tweeted that his brain computer chip technology, which he believes will turn humans into a genius super race, is coming soon.

The billionaire has been developing the technology, called Neuralink, because he thinks humans must become one with machines in order to survive being replaced by artificial intelligence.

Musk's plan to "save the human race" involves wiring computer chips into our minds to merge us with artificial intelligence.
26-Apr-2019
From Mashable India

Researchers have been making massive ‘jaw-dropping’ strides in robotics lately. We’re already aware of Sophia, the ‘almost human’ robot created by former Disney Imagineer David Hanson, that can inspire feelings of love among humans. Now, scientists at Cornell University have come out with a new ‘lifelike’ material that can move and eat on its own. What’s even more mind-boggling is that this material can also die and decay, just like living beings.

26-Apr-2019
From Science Alert

Humanity could be on the verge of an unprecedented merging of human biology with advanced technology, fusing our thoughts and knowledge directly with the cloud in real-time – and this incredible turning point may be just decades away, scientists say.

In a new research paper exploring what they call the 'human brain/cloud interface', scientists explain the technological underpinnings of what such a future system might be, and also address the barriers we'll need to address before this sci-fi dream becomes reality.

29-Jan-2019
From Forbes
I was in line for coffee at the Business Innovation Factory (BIF) Summit this past September and was starting to get jittery. I began making conversation with the guy in front of me to distract myself, and since java was on my mind I figured that was as good a topic as any. So I made a throwaway comment about how useless I was until I got my morning cup.
20-May-2019
From Medium
An emerging techno-consumerism is taking aim at what makes us human: love, happiness, politics, the search for meaning and more. It amounts to the beginnings of a new kind of modernity.

The founders of a new, AI-fuelled chatbot want it to become your best friend and most perceptive counsellor. An intelligent robot pet promises to assuage chronic loneliness among the elderly. The creators of an immersive virtual world — meant to be populated by thousands or even millions of users — say it will generate new insight into the nature of justice and democracy.
Three seemingly unrelated snapshots of these dizzying, accelerated times. But look closer and they all point towards the beginnings of a profound shift in our relationship to technology. How we use it and relate to it. What we think, ultimately, it is for.
This shift amounts to the emergence of a new kind of modern experience; a new kind of modernity. Let’s assign this emerging moment a name — augmented modernity.
10-May-2019
From Worldhealth.net
Imagine if you will, the possibility of future technology that can provide instant access to information and artificial intelligence simply by thinking of it; communication, education, work, privacy, security, and the world as we know it would be dramatically transformed.

An article published in Frontiers in Neuroscience predicts that exponential progress in nanotechnology, nanomedicine, artificial intelligence, and computation will lead to development of a Human Brain/Cloud Interface that will connect brain cells to vast cloud computing networks in real time within this century bringing about the internet of thought.

Image credits: https://androidjones.com
03-May-2019
From The Sun
Elon Musk has tweeted that his brain computer chip technology, which he believes will turn humans into a genius super race, is coming soon.

The billionaire has been developing the technology, called Neuralink, because he thinks humans must become one with machines in order to survive being replaced by artificial intelligence.

Musk's plan to "save the human race" involves wiring computer chips into our minds to merge us with artificial intelligence.
26-Apr-2019
From Science Alert

Humanity could be on the verge of an unprecedented merging of human biology with advanced technology, fusing our thoughts and knowledge directly with the cloud in real-time – and this incredible turning point may be just decades away, scientists say.

In a new research paper exploring what they call the 'human brain/cloud interface', scientists explain the technological underpinnings of what such a future system might be, and also address the barriers we'll need to address before this sci-fi dream becomes reality.

29-Jan-2019
From The Sociable
“The hour hath come to part with this body composed of flesh and blood” – The Tibetan Book of the Dead

Digital immortality through merging the brain with Artificial Intelligence in a brain-computer interface is already well underway with companies like Elon Musk’s Neuralink.
27-Jan-2019
From Quanta Magazine

Computer scientists are looking to evolutionary biology for inspiration in the search for optimal solutions among astronomically huge sets of possibilities.

No items found.
20-May-2019
From Popsci.com
The first U.S. trial of CRISPR in humans has begun, NPR reported Tuesday. Two patients are currently being treated as part of a University of Pennsylvania study. Per NPR, both have difficult-to-treat forms of cancer and both have relapsed after regular treatments. As part of the trial, researchers are taking immune cells from the patients’ own bodies and editing them with CRISPR before putting them back in. The hope is that these edited cells will be better at identifying and attacking the cancer than their unaltered counterparts. According to the U.S. government clinical trial registry, the researchers are hoping to enroll 18 people in their study.
20-May-2019
From New York Times
Scientists have created a living organism whose DNA is entirely human-made — perhaps a new form of life, experts said, and a milestone in the field of synthetic biology.

Researchers at the Medical Research Council Laboratory of Molecular Biology in Britain reported on Wednesday that they had rewritten the DNA of the bacteria Escherichia coli, fashioning a synthetic genome four times larger and far more complex than any previously created.
26-Apr-2019
From Mashable India

Researchers have been making massive ‘jaw-dropping’ strides in robotics lately. We’re already aware of Sophia, the ‘almost human’ robot created by former Disney Imagineer David Hanson, that can inspire feelings of love among humans. Now, scientists at Cornell University have come out with a new ‘lifelike’ material that can move and eat on its own. What’s even more mind-boggling is that this material can also die and decay, just like living beings.

29-Jan-2019
From Forbes
I was in line for coffee at the Business Innovation Factory (BIF) Summit this past September and was starting to get jittery. I began making conversation with the guy in front of me to distract myself, and since java was on my mind I figured that was as good a topic as any. So I made a throwaway comment about how useless I was until I got my morning cup.
26-Apr-2019
From WIRED

A year ago, you couldn’t go anywhere in Silicon Valley without being reminded in some way of Tristan Harris. The former Googler was giving talks, appearing on podcasts, counseling Congress, sitting on panels, posing for photographers. The central argument of his evangelism—that the digital revolution had gone from expanding our minds to hijacking them—had hit the zeitgeist, and maybe even helped create it.

29-Jan-2019
From We Forum
According to a new study, people who saw what it would be like to lose their jobs and homes using virtual reality developed longer-lasting compassion toward the homeless compared to those who explored other media versions of the VR scenario, like text.

“Experiences are what define us as humans, so it’s not surprising that an intense experience in VR is more impactful than imagining something,” says Jeremy Bailenson, a professor of communication at Stanford University and coauthor of the paper, which appears in PLOS ONE.
20-May-2019
From Nautilus
Contrary to popular belief, peace and quiet is all about the noise in your head.

One icy night in March 2010, 100 marketing experts piled into the Sea Horse Restaurant in Helsinki, with the modest goal of making a remote and medium-sized country a world-famous tourist destination. The problem was that Finland was known as a rather quiet country, and since 2008, the Country Brand Delegation had been looking for a national brand that would make some noise.

Over drinks at the Sea Horse, the experts puzzled over the various strengths of their nation. Here was a country with exceptional teachers, an abundance of wild berries and mushrooms, and a vibrant cultural capital the size of Nashville, Tennessee. These things fell a bit short of a compelling national identity. Someone jokingly suggested that nudity could be named a national theme—it would emphasize the honesty of Finns. Someone else, less jokingly, proposed that perhaps quiet wasn’t such a bad thing. That got them thinking.
26-Apr-2019
From WIRED

A year ago, you couldn’t go anywhere in Silicon Valley without being reminded in some way of Tristan Harris. The former Googler was giving talks, appearing on podcasts, counseling Congress, sitting on panels, posing for photographers. The central argument of his evangelism—that the digital revolution had gone from expanding our minds to hijacking them—had hit the zeitgeist, and maybe even helped create it.

27-Feb-2019
From Fastcompany.com

Google was founded over two decades ago, but they released their first public set of ethical technology principles just last year. Facebook launched out of a Harvard dorm in 2004, but they formally launched an ethics program with a public investment last month. The era of tech companies moving fast and breaking things removed from public accountability is waning, if not entirely over. That’s precisely why it’s important for industry to understand–and admit in some cases–that there’s been a need for accountable, transparent, and companywide ethical practices in technology since the beginning.

27-Feb-2019
From London Business School

What does it mean for humans to thrive in the age of the machine? This is the issue that London Business School professors Andrew Scott and Lynda Gratton are wrestling with in their second major exploration project.

10-May-2019
From Worldhealth.net
Imagine if you will, the possibility of future technology that can provide instant access to information and artificial intelligence simply by thinking of it; communication, education, work, privacy, security, and the world as we know it would be dramatically transformed.

An article published in Frontiers in Neuroscience predicts that exponential progress in nanotechnology, nanomedicine, artificial intelligence, and computation will lead to development of a Human Brain/Cloud Interface that will connect brain cells to vast cloud computing networks in real time within this century bringing about the internet of thought.

Image credits: https://androidjones.com
20-May-2019
From Aeon
Is this life real?
Philosophers and physicists say we might be living in a computer simulation, but how can we tell? And does it matter?

Our species is not going to last forever. One way or another, humanity will vanish from the Universe, but before it does, it might summon together sufficient computing power to emulate human experience, in all of its rich detail. Some philosophers and physicists have begun to wonder if we’re already there. Maybe we are in a computer simulation, and the reality we experience is just part of the program.
20-May-2019
From Futurism
In a new interview, MIT researcher Rizwan Virk told Digital Trends that, in his estimation, we’re probably living in a simulation.
“I would say it’s somewhere between 50 and 100 percent,” he told the site. “I think it’s more likely that we’re in simulation than not.”
20-May-2019
From Nautilus
Contrary to popular belief, peace and quiet is all about the noise in your head.

One icy night in March 2010, 100 marketing experts piled into the Sea Horse Restaurant in Helsinki, with the modest goal of making a remote and medium-sized country a world-famous tourist destination. The problem was that Finland was known as a rather quiet country, and since 2008, the Country Brand Delegation had been looking for a national brand that would make some noise.

Over drinks at the Sea Horse, the experts puzzled over the various strengths of their nation. Here was a country with exceptional teachers, an abundance of wild berries and mushrooms, and a vibrant cultural capital the size of Nashville, Tennessee. These things fell a bit short of a compelling national identity. Someone jokingly suggested that nudity could be named a national theme—it would emphasize the honesty of Finns. Someone else, less jokingly, proposed that perhaps quiet wasn’t such a bad thing. That got them thinking.
20-May-2019
From Medium
An emerging techno-consumerism is taking aim at what makes us human: love, happiness, politics, the search for meaning and more. It amounts to the beginnings of a new kind of modernity.

The founders of a new, AI-fuelled chatbot want it to become your best friend and most perceptive counsellor. An intelligent robot pet promises to assuage chronic loneliness among the elderly. The creators of an immersive virtual world — meant to be populated by thousands or even millions of users — say it will generate new insight into the nature of justice and democracy.
Three seemingly unrelated snapshots of these dizzying, accelerated times. But look closer and they all point towards the beginnings of a profound shift in our relationship to technology. How we use it and relate to it. What we think, ultimately, it is for.
This shift amounts to the emergence of a new kind of modern experience; a new kind of modernity. Let’s assign this emerging moment a name — augmented modernity.
26-Apr-2019
From Hackernoon

In Part I of this series, Religion and the Simulation Hypothesis: Is God an AI?, we looked at the implications of the Simulation Hypothesis, the theory that we are all living inside a sophisticated video game, as a model for how many things that are religious in nature might actually be implemented using science and technology. We looked briefly at the groundbreaking film, the Matrix, and how it brought this idea forward into popular consciousness with its release 20 years ago. We also looked at some of the central tenets of the Western (or more accurately, Middle Eastern or Abrahamic) religious traditions to show how they were not only consistent with this new theory, but this theory provided a way to bridge the ever-widening gap between religion and science.
In this second part of the series, we turn to the Eastern religious traditions, Hinduism and Buddhism in particular (and some of their offshoots), and look at some of its central tenants. While we had to search for ways that simulation hypothesis might be implied in some of the core beliefs of the Western religions, the simulation hypothesis (or more specifically, the video game version of the simulation hypothesis) seem almost tailor made to fit into these traditions.

29-Jan-2019
From Herald Scotland
WHISPER it, but many respected scientists and academics are becoming increasingly convinced by left-field provocateur David Icke’s assertion that our reality is an artificial simulation.
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20-May-2019
From Engadget
A breakthrough in studying light might just be the ticket to the future of quantum computing. Researchers at EPFL have found a way to determine how light behaves beyond the limitations of wavelengths, opening the door to encoding quantum data in a sci-fi style holographic light pattern. The team took advantage of the quantum nature of the interaction between electrons and light to separate beams in terms energy, not space -- that let them use light pulses to encrypt info on the electron wave and map it with a speedy electron microscope.

Existing techniques for both studying light and extracting 3D info are inherently limited by the size of wavelengths. This allows a considerably higher resolution that can even include holographic movies of fast-moving objects.
20-May-2019
From Engadget
"The future won't be the future without a Princess Leia projector."

SciFi movies like Star Wars and Avatar depict holograms that you can see from any angle, but the reality is a lot less scintillating. So far, the only true color hologram we've seen come from a tiny, complicated display created by a Korean group led by LG, while the rest are just "Pepper's Ghost" style illusions. Now, researchers from Brigham Young University (BYU) have created a true 3D hologram, or "volumetric image," to use the correct term. "We can think about this image like a 3D-printed object," said BYU assistant prof and lead author Daniel Smalley.
09-Feb-2019
From Vulture
When Morpheus told us our reality was fake, it sounded far-fetched. Since then, though, the idea has picked up steam. In 2001, two years after The Matrix hit theaters, Oxford University philosopher Nick Bostrom circulated the first draft of his “simulation argument,” which posits three scenarios: (1) Humanity will go extinct before creating technology powerful enough to run convincing simulations of reality; (2) humanity will live to see such technology but decide, for whatever reason, not to run any simulations; (3) humanity will create that technology and run many different simulations of its evolutionary history — in which case there would be lots of simulated realities and only one non-simulated one, so maybe it’s more likely than not that we’re living in a simulation right now. That third scenario has excited many over the years, including Elon Musk, who in 2016 put our odds of living in a non-simulated reality at “one in billions.” We called Bostrom to discuss his paper’s legacy.
29-Jan-2019
From Herald Scotland
WHISPER it, but many respected scientists and academics are becoming increasingly convinced by left-field provocateur David Icke’s assertion that our reality is an artificial simulation.
10-May-2019
From Worldhealth.net
Imagine if you will, the possibility of future technology that can provide instant access to information and artificial intelligence simply by thinking of it; communication, education, work, privacy, security, and the world as we know it would be dramatically transformed.

An article published in Frontiers in Neuroscience predicts that exponential progress in nanotechnology, nanomedicine, artificial intelligence, and computation will lead to development of a Human Brain/Cloud Interface that will connect brain cells to vast cloud computing networks in real time within this century bringing about the internet of thought.

Image credits: https://androidjones.com
26-Apr-2019
From Science Alert

Humanity could be on the verge of an unprecedented merging of human biology with advanced technology, fusing our thoughts and knowledge directly with the cloud in real-time – and this incredible turning point may be just decades away, scientists say.

In a new research paper exploring what they call the 'human brain/cloud interface', scientists explain the technological underpinnings of what such a future system might be, and also address the barriers we'll need to address before this sci-fi dream becomes reality.

20-May-2019
From Engadget
A breakthrough in studying light might just be the ticket to the future of quantum computing. Researchers at EPFL have found a way to determine how light behaves beyond the limitations of wavelengths, opening the door to encoding quantum data in a sci-fi style holographic light pattern. The team took advantage of the quantum nature of the interaction between electrons and light to separate beams in terms energy, not space -- that let them use light pulses to encrypt info on the electron wave and map it with a speedy electron microscope.

Existing techniques for both studying light and extracting 3D info are inherently limited by the size of wavelengths. This allows a considerably higher resolution that can even include holographic movies of fast-moving objects.
26-Apr-2019
From Phys.org

A localization phenomenon boosts the accuracy of solving quantum many-body problems with quantum computers. These problems are otherwise challenging for conventional computers. This brings such digital quantum simulation within reach using quantum devices available today.

29-Jan-2019
From Big Think
For six minutes, 150 miles above Kiruna, Sweden on January 23, 2017 floated the coldest known spot in the universe. As far as we know, the coldest anything in nature can be is absolute zero on the Kelvin scale, which is –459.67°F and –273.15°C. This postage-stamp-sized atom chip packed tight with thousands of rubidium-87 atoms was just a few billionths of a degree warmer than that. The atom chip was up there in low orbit to help a team of scientist study up-close some of the oddest, least-understood stuff there is: Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC). The team of German scientists was led by Dennis Becker of QUEST-Leibniz Research School, Leibniz University Hannover, Hanover, Germany.
03-May-2019
From The Sun
Elon Musk has tweeted that his brain computer chip technology, which he believes will turn humans into a genius super race, is coming soon.

The billionaire has been developing the technology, called Neuralink, because he thinks humans must become one with machines in order to survive being replaced by artificial intelligence.

Musk's plan to "save the human race" involves wiring computer chips into our minds to merge us with artificial intelligence.
27-Jan-2019
From Quanta Magazine

Computer scientists are looking to evolutionary biology for inspiration in the search for optimal solutions among astronomically huge sets of possibilities.

26-Apr-2019
From Mashable India

Researchers have been making massive ‘jaw-dropping’ strides in robotics lately. We’re already aware of Sophia, the ‘almost human’ robot created by former Disney Imagineer David Hanson, that can inspire feelings of love among humans. Now, scientists at Cornell University have come out with a new ‘lifelike’ material that can move and eat on its own. What’s even more mind-boggling is that this material can also die and decay, just like living beings.

26-Apr-2019
From Science Alert

Humanity could be on the verge of an unprecedented merging of human biology with advanced technology, fusing our thoughts and knowledge directly with the cloud in real-time – and this incredible turning point may be just decades away, scientists say.

In a new research paper exploring what they call the 'human brain/cloud interface', scientists explain the technological underpinnings of what such a future system might be, and also address the barriers we'll need to address before this sci-fi dream becomes reality.

29-Jan-2019
From The Sociable
“The hour hath come to part with this body composed of flesh and blood” – The Tibetan Book of the Dead

Digital immortality through merging the brain with Artificial Intelligence in a brain-computer interface is already well underway with companies like Elon Musk’s Neuralink.
29-Jan-2019
From Herald Scotland
WHISPER it, but many respected scientists and academics are becoming increasingly convinced by left-field provocateur David Icke’s assertion that our reality is an artificial simulation.
27-Jan-2019
From RT News

The human brain may become the next frontier in hacking, cybersecurity researchers have warned in a paper outlining the vulnerabilities of neural implant technologies that can potentially expose and compromise our consciousness.

20-May-2019
From Aeon
Is this life real?
Philosophers and physicists say we might be living in a computer simulation, but how can we tell? And does it matter?

Our species is not going to last forever. One way or another, humanity will vanish from the Universe, but before it does, it might summon together sufficient computing power to emulate human experience, in all of its rich detail. Some philosophers and physicists have begun to wonder if we’re already there. Maybe we are in a computer simulation, and the reality we experience is just part of the program.
20-May-2019
From Futurism
In a new interview, MIT researcher Rizwan Virk told Digital Trends that, in his estimation, we’re probably living in a simulation.
“I would say it’s somewhere between 50 and 100 percent,” he told the site. “I think it’s more likely that we’re in simulation than not.”
20-May-2019
From Engadget
"The future won't be the future without a Princess Leia projector."

SciFi movies like Star Wars and Avatar depict holograms that you can see from any angle, but the reality is a lot less scintillating. So far, the only true color hologram we've seen come from a tiny, complicated display created by a Korean group led by LG, while the rest are just "Pepper's Ghost" style illusions. Now, researchers from Brigham Young University (BYU) have created a true 3D hologram, or "volumetric image," to use the correct term. "We can think about this image like a 3D-printed object," said BYU assistant prof and lead author Daniel Smalley.
20-May-2019
From Medium
An emerging techno-consumerism is taking aim at what makes us human: love, happiness, politics, the search for meaning and more. It amounts to the beginnings of a new kind of modernity.

The founders of a new, AI-fuelled chatbot want it to become your best friend and most perceptive counsellor. An intelligent robot pet promises to assuage chronic loneliness among the elderly. The creators of an immersive virtual world — meant to be populated by thousands or even millions of users — say it will generate new insight into the nature of justice and democracy.
Three seemingly unrelated snapshots of these dizzying, accelerated times. But look closer and they all point towards the beginnings of a profound shift in our relationship to technology. How we use it and relate to it. What we think, ultimately, it is for.
This shift amounts to the emergence of a new kind of modern experience; a new kind of modernity. Let’s assign this emerging moment a name — augmented modernity.
09-Feb-2019
From Vulture
When Morpheus told us our reality was fake, it sounded far-fetched. Since then, though, the idea has picked up steam. In 2001, two years after The Matrix hit theaters, Oxford University philosopher Nick Bostrom circulated the first draft of his “simulation argument,” which posits three scenarios: (1) Humanity will go extinct before creating technology powerful enough to run convincing simulations of reality; (2) humanity will live to see such technology but decide, for whatever reason, not to run any simulations; (3) humanity will create that technology and run many different simulations of its evolutionary history — in which case there would be lots of simulated realities and only one non-simulated one, so maybe it’s more likely than not that we’re living in a simulation right now. That third scenario has excited many over the years, including Elon Musk, who in 2016 put our odds of living in a non-simulated reality at “one in billions.” We called Bostrom to discuss his paper’s legacy.
29-Jan-2019
From Herald Scotland
WHISPER it, but many respected scientists and academics are becoming increasingly convinced by left-field provocateur David Icke’s assertion that our reality is an artificial simulation.
29-Jan-2019
From New Scientist
An illusion that mimics near-death experiences seems to reduce people’s fear of dying.

Mel Slater at the University of Barcelona, Spain, and his team have used virtual reality headsets to create the illusion of being separate from your own body. They did this by first making 32 volunteers feel like a virtual body was their own. While wearing a headset, the body would match any real movements the volunteers made. When a virtual ball was dropped onto the foot of the virtual body, a vibration was triggered on the person’s real foot.
29-Jan-2019
From We Forum
According to a new study, people who saw what it would be like to lose their jobs and homes using virtual reality developed longer-lasting compassion toward the homeless compared to those who explored other media versions of the VR scenario, like text.

“Experiences are what define us as humans, so it’s not surprising that an intense experience in VR is more impactful than imagining something,” says Jeremy Bailenson, a professor of communication at Stanford University and coauthor of the paper, which appears in PLOS ONE.
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